• Ray
    466
    In this video, I install the TOGO Roadlink C2 by Winegard WiFi Booster and 4G LTE router on the roof of the RV. Then I go over the product setup and operation and give it a quick 4G data speed test.



    The TOGO device comes with an exclusive cell data plan offering from AT&T. For an upfront cost of $360, you get 1 year of unlimited 4G data. A pretty sweet deal for RVers that travel and camp a lot. They also have a monthly plan - 5 gigs for $25.

    I have purchased the yearly unlimited plan and will test it over the next few weeks as we travel in the US southwest. I'll then come back with my full review of the TOGO RV performance.

    Related Links:

    Wingard ConnecT 2 Install and Review - https://www.loveyourrv.com/winegard-connect-2-0-installation-and-review-wifi-extender-4g-lte/

    TOGO RV - https://www.runswithtogo.com/roadlink-product-details

    Winegard - https://winegard.com/products/cellular/4g-lte-hotspots/togo-roadlink-c2/togo-roadlink-c2

    AT&T - https://www.att.com/plans/connected-car/togo-roadlink.html
  • Willie
    11
    Ray...I’d like to see a head to head comparison with a WeBoost 4G as far as cell signal boosting. Since we are mostly boondockers we really depend upon the WeBoost for a cell and data signal. But I don’t have a wifi router, so we’re limited to using our phones to surf the web. I’d love to be able to use my wifi only iPad, but I don’t want to switch to the Togo if it doesn’t do what my WeBoost does as far as pulling in a weak signal. Tks.
  • Ray
    466
    They are sort of apples and oranges. The TOGO RV Winegard is a single cell data hotspot on the single carrier AT&T. The weBoost amplifies all types of cell carrier signals and can do multiple devices at the same time.

    The weBoost is a booster with the outside cell antenna to a cell amplifier in the rig then the signal is rebroadcast by an inside cell antenna.

    The TOGO RV has an outside cell antenna that captures the ATT cell signal then converts it to a WiFi signal and feeds it into a WiFi signal router then rebroadcasts it via WiFi antennas inside the unit itself on the roof.

    Having said that the last trip I did to the US for 6 months we only used the weBoost system 3 times. I'm finding cell coverage is improving to rural areas each year making the booster less and less needed. The biggest pain point I encounter now is crowded, slow cell towers when that happens speeds slow and disconnects happen, no booster can solve that. That's why having multiple data devices and carrier options helps as many times one carrier is slow and another is fast.

    I'm actually testing a different cell booster right now as well from American Booster. https://www.loveyourrv.com/rv-cell-signal-booster-installation-american-booster-voltex-50/ Headed to Death Valley today and hear cell signals are weak there so it will be a good test for both systems I hope.
  • Willie
    11
    Understood. But does the Winegard boost the ATT signal at all, or does the roof-top antenna and processor make collecting the signal more efficient? If so, is it as effective as my WeBoost?

    As far as cell signals, we have a 4x4 camper and get waaaaay to the fringes, and beyond, of cell coverage. A lot of times we only get coverage from midnight to 4 am when others are not using the cell tower(s). When we’re off-grid we fall back on our satellite-based Garmin InReach for communications.

    I can’t wait for satellite based internet. I suspect with crazy thinkers like Elon Must, et al, we’ll see something workable in a year or two.
  • Logan X
    79
    Willie,

    Just an idea for using your WiFi only iPad. Did you consider using your phone as a WiFi hotspot and connecting your iPad via your phone as a hot spot? I do this with my Apple TV and it works pretty well to get WiFi using a cell phone.

    I’m not super duper tech savvy so sorry if this doesn’t address your needs.

    Take care!
  • Ray
    466
    I'm not certain, they don't publish much about the internals, but my feeling is it has some boost to it as it pretty worked well in weak signal areas, I imagine it's limited to 50 dB gain like all the other mobile solutions. I see that people that really need fringe coverage usually go with a Yagi antenna mounted on a mast and pointed at the nearest cell tower.

    weBoost has this kit solution https://www.weboost.com/products/connect-rv-65 but looks like a pain to set up all the time.
  • Willie
    11
    Have thought about the phone as wifi. It’s cheaper than a MyFi or similar.  Might have to visit my local ATT store before we head out for our next adventure in January.

    The WeBoost 4G with the round trucker antenna seems to do very well for us. Since we take the truck down tight trails, I have the antenna stowed until we’re settled, then I deploy. The yagi is an interesting concept, but I’m quickly running out of interest trying to maximize my connection to the outside world.

    When we have no connectivity we fall back on...gasp....books. And I refuse to have a TV on board. Nothing but mind numbing c**p on the idiot box. Nature is better than a dang TV anyway.

    Tks Ray. Your content is first rate, your delivery is pleasant and is without hype and self-promotion. I like it that way!
  • Tim Smith
    12
    I too am following you @Ray to hear of your results with the new system. I am also interested in the Ethernet jack utilization (recognizing you most likely will not utilize) as i have my fifth wheel hard wired and it’s own internal WAP as well.
    I built my own yagi system for long distance WiFi and I yagi the nighthawk and hard wire it to my internal system when WiFi is not available.
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