• Lisa's RV Experience
    56
    Greetings all, I have a class A Winnebago gas RV and currently flat tow a Chevy Sonic that weights about 2,900 pounds without the tow plate and front hookups. My Winnebago is about 200-300 pounds from full cargo carrying capacity weight. I'm wondering if anyone can help be determine if I can flat tow a Jeep Wrangler that weighs about 4,000? I get lost in the formulas and aren't sure if it's the actual weight of the vehicle or the hitch downward weight?? Any advise?
  • NA8M
    1
    Lisa:

    When you are towing a toad you do not significantly add weight to the rig's weight. I would be more worried about the cumulative weight of your RV and toad going down the road. Take a few minutes to visit a scale and then consult the information posted inside the RV. In my town the local farm elevator has a scale. I roll on the scale, one axle at a time, to get all the weights. I hear that a truck stop's C.A.T. scale will weigh each axle with just one stop on the scale.

    This doesn't tell me side to side weight, but it is a good start.

    You should pay particular attention to the GCWR.

    I found this link and it might be helpful?

    http://changingears.com/rv-sec-tow-vehicles-understand.shtml

    Bill, NA8M
  • Lisa's RV Experience
    56
    Thanks Bill, good link for helping me understand. I've done the CAT scales before I got solar installed, I guess I need to start there.
  • Sregor
    2
    Hi Lisa -
    I don't want to insult your intelligence or anything, but please also check on your Jeep to make sure you can flat-tow it without some extra steps. On mine, for example (a 2000 XJ), you have to disconnect the front drive shaft, and that likely applies to your Wrangler if it's a TJ or LJ since they all share drivetrain bits. Cheers! Adam
  • NA8M
    1
    I flat tow an '04 Wrangler. I put the transmission in neutral, select neutral on the 2H, 4H, N, 4L transfer case, and then put the engine back in gear. When the transfer case is in N, the engine started, and a gear selected (I try D or R on my automatic) my Jeep will not roll when all the ducks are aligned. I have an automatic transmission but the process is the same with a standard transmission. If you do not have a transfer case then I suggest your Jeep will not flat tow. I would ask the dealer. I did go to YouTube to get the steps to tow my Wrangler.

    The thing you are looking for is to convert the toad into a trailer that will effortlessly roll.

    Also I encourage you to have a supplemental braking system. If the toad comes adrift from the MH and there is no provision for an emergency break-away brake I shudder at the totally and royally ruined day or even week I will suffer while picking up the pieces.

    I suggest that if you have to disconnect your driveshaft in order to convert to a toad that will rapidly become a HUGE inconvenience. True story: When I'm towing a toad I do not have reverse. There have been a few times where I needed the toad disconnected to get back out of the too tight confines of a gas station. There are not hours in a day to get me under the toad, hook-up the driveshaft, and move the toad, all while being in a rainstorm. I haven't tried this and I bet you will not relish the experience! My MH is a gasser. I guess if it were a diesel rig I might never find myself in a too tight situation. YMMV

    Bill, NA8M
  • Sregor
    2
    Totally agree, I would NOT want to be in a situation where I have to be removing or re-attaching drive shafts all the time either. Sounds like a nightmare, though you'd still have RWD even with the front shaft removed for maneuvering in gas stations or wherever. The drama/debate on Jeeps seems to be around the NP231 T-case, and whether or not your Neutral is a "true neutral" or merely uncouples your engine input from the T-case (leaving the rear and front driveshafts connected to each other). Some (with newer ones, no doubt) argue it's fine, others (with older ones) have a lot of skipping, banging, and tire wear when they round corners and the front wheels try to move at a different speed than the rears. But this isn't a Jeep forum, so I'll shut up now :) The Jeep in question here is probably a newer JK or JL with a totally different T-case anyway and I don't mean to hijack the thread. Cheers!
  • Lisa's RV Experience
    56
    please don't think you're Insulting me at all! I am currently flat towing a small Chevy and I'm just looking to trade it in for a Jeep.
  • Lisa's RV Experience
    56
    no worries on that, I didn't even know there was a JK or a JL type! That's why I posted here this is a friendly forum and everyone gives helpful advice.
  • Sregor
    2
    Sounds like a great idea! Jeeps are awesome for exploring where most RVs won't go, that's for sure. I haven't RV'd long, but I've been into Jeeps for a while and am easily lured into geeking out on them. :) If you're going for a Wrangler that's like Bill's 04 (TJ) or newer, I'm sure you won't have any problems and YouTube is very helpful on getting it set up for flat towing - and I see JK (2007-2017) and JL (2018+) Wrangler "toads" all the time. My Jeep is a bit older and falls into a mystical grey area so I thought I'd mention this whole transfer case thing just because not all Jeeps flat-tow equally. So, I tow an old 94 Chevy Tracker haha. Best of luck, and sorry I didn't have much to add to your original question about weights and tow limits.
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