• Tim Smith
    8
    Looking for recommendation of path / pattern for tire rotation on fifth wheel please. For example passenger rear to driver’s front...

  • RayAccepted Answer
    436
    I usually just move mine front to back keeping them on the same side so they don't change their rolling direction, but I generally wear them out every few years.
  • Tim Smith
    8
    Thanks for your feedback!! Heading out now to adjust the brakes and rotate the tires after our first 7,900 mile round trip with our new to us rig.k6w4zg0e5mx2kjga.jpeg
  • Rush and Lola
    111
    Go get disk brakes put on. Best thing we ever done. Boy they will lock the tires with I need.
  • JESFL
    1
    Here's a somewhat-related-to-tire-rotation question. Just watched a video where a gent went through a 3-phase torque process on when replacing his tire. The torque wrench levels were in his owner's manual. I have no such manual for my 2004 fifth wheel. How do I get proper torque levels? Does everyone use a 3-phase torque-down process?
  • Ray
    436
    My manual had a procedure like that in it, check starting on page 20 - https://www.keystonerv.com/media/2110/owners_manual_2012.pdf
    I doubt most people do it and I know that most tire places don't in fact I haven't seen one do it. ;)
    Usually, torque is based on wheel stud size and metal grade and steel versus aluminum wheels. If in doubt ask a good tire shop.
  • T-Rex
    5
    I've long since forgotten where I learned this, but the way I do it is:
    finger tighten all of the lug nuts, use the tire iron to snug them down in a criss-cross pattern, torque them down in a criss-cross pattern. Since I have all OEM wheels, I use the torque setting in the owners manual. I'd follow Ray's suggestion for finding the torque setting.
  • Tim Smith
    8
    agreed to this process - my manual also says to re check torque after heavy braking - I assume due to heating?? I only hand torque - even though I have the specs on the settings on my electric torque wrench. - just my perspective.
  • JESFL
    1
    Thanks so much to all! Very helpful. Replacing both tires and rims (old rims very dinged and rusted, keeping one only for a spare). Buying aluminum rims with proper capacity. But didn't think that different materials for the rims would affect torque. Any additional thoughts anyone?
    Ray, rims appear similar to those on your Cougar. Also chose Goodyear Endurance tires at a very good price. Are you still happy with your Goodyears, Ray?
  • Cmsafford
    0
    I went from steel wheels to aluminum. I use the 120 ft-lbs for the aluminum and have not had any issues. I do know it is higher for the aluminum wheels vs. the steel rims.
  • JESFL
    1
    Also very helpful to know. Thanks once again!
  • TimB
    0
    Our 2019.5 Cedar Creek with 6,000 lb. axles and aluminum wheels calls for 110 ft. lbs. so that't what I do. Agree with Ray though, that it's based on the size of the axle studs. I tighten mine gradually in a star pattern, but just do it by feel until the wrench clicks at 110.
bold
italic
underline
strike
code
quote
ulist
image
url
mention
reveal
youtube
tweet
Add a Comment